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Disabil Rehabil. 2009;31(16):1301-10. doi: 10.1080/09638280802532639.

Factors perceived as being related to accidental falls by persons with multiple sclerosis.

Author information

1
Department of Physiotherapy, Orebro University Hospital, Orebro, Sweden. ylva.nilsagard@orebroll.se

Abstract

PURPOSE:

This study explores and describes factors that persons with multiple sclerosis (MS) perceive as being related to accidental falls.

METHOD:

A qualitative content analysis with primarily deductive approach was conducted using the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health. Twelve persons with MS, and identified as fallers, were interviewed.

RESULTS:

Factors perceived to cause accidental falls that had not previously been targeted in MS populations in relation to falls were identified as divided attention, reduced muscular endurance, fatigue and heat sensitivity. Previously reported risk factors such as changed gait pattern, limited walking ability, impaired proprioception, vision and spasticity were supported. Activities involving walking, recreation and leisure, maintaining and changing body position, lifting or carrying, taking care of the home, washing the body, moving around, preparing meals and housekeeping were limited and considered to be risk activities. Supportive persons and assistive device reduced falls, and unsuitable physical environments and climate conditions induced falls. Several preventative strategies were described as partially compensating for the impairments, limitations and restrictions.

CONCLUSIONS:

Investigating accidental falls using the perspective of the patient gave important information about variables not earlier targeted in MS research.

PMID:
19479575
DOI:
10.1080/09638280802532639
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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