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J Epidemiol Community Health. 2009 Jul;63(7):563-8. doi: 10.1136/jech.2008.077750. Epub 2009 May 28.

Exposure to interparental violence and psychosocial maladjustment in the adult life course: advocacy for early prevention.

Author information

  • 1UMR-S 707 INSERM-Universit√© Pierre et Marie Curie-Paris6, Research Group on Social Determinants of Health and Health Care, 27, rue Chaligny, 75012 Paris, France. christelle.roustit@inserm.fr

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Early family-level and social-level stressors are both assumed to be the components of two main path models explaining the association between exposure to interparental violence in childhood and its long-term consequences on mental health explored through life-course epidemiological studies.

AIMS:

To investigate the association between exposure to interparental violence in childhood and mental health outcomes in adulthood when taking into account early family and social stressors.

METHODS:

A retrospective French cohort study of 3023 adults representative of the general population in the Paris metropolitan area was conducted in 2005 through at-home, face-to-face interviews. The outcomes measures were current depression and lifetime suicide attempt, intimate partner violence, violence against children and alcohol dependence.

RESULTS:

The adults exposed to interparental violence during childhood had a higher risk of psychosocial maladjustment. After adjusting for family- and social-level stressors in childhood, this risk was, respectively, 1.44 (95% CI 1.03 to 2.00) for depression, 3.17 (1.75 to 5.73) for conjugal violence, 4.75 (1.60 to 14.14) for child maltreatment and 1.75 (1.19 to 2.57) for alcohol dependence.

CONCLUSIONS:

The adult consequences of parental violence in childhood-and this independently of the other forms of domestic violence and the related psychosocial risks-should lead to intensifying the prevention of and screening for this form of maltreatment of children.

PMID:
19477880
PMCID:
PMC2696641
DOI:
10.1136/jech.2008.077750
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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