Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Ann Phys Rehabil Med. 2009 Jul;52(6):475-84. doi: 10.1016/j.rehab.2009.02.006. Epub 2009 May 23.

Single-leg assessment of postural stability and knee functional outcome two years after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

[Article in English, French]

Author information

1
Ksar-Said Higher Institute of Sports and Physical Education, résidence Essaada, rue 13-Août, Manouba, 2010, Tunisia. amira_zouita@yahoo.fr

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To analyse postural stability and the single-leg hop for distance in subjects 2 years after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR), in comparison with an age- and activity-matched control group.

DESIGN AND SETTING:

Subjects reported to a sports medicine or athletic training research laboratory for testing.

SUBJECTS:

Twenty-six subjects having undergone ACLR and 26 age- and activity-matched controls were selected to participate in this study. An arthroscopically-assisted, central, one-third bone-patellar tendon procedure was used to repair the ACLs.

MEASUREMENTS:

One-leg stance postural stability was measured with the NeuroCom Balance Master platform system. We recorded the single-leg hop for distance as an objective measure of function.

RESULTS:

We found a significant difference (p<0.05) between the ACLR and control subjects in terms of the one-leg stance sway velocity (knee fully extended) on the operated side.

CONCLUSIONS:

After ACLR (mean time postoperatively: 24+/-1 months), single-leg hop for distance score was normal, when compared with the contralateral limb. Our results indicate that 2 years after surgery, single-limb postural stability in the ACLR group differed significantly from that in the control group. The persistence of poor stability control may be correlated to an impairment in proprioception.

PMID:
19477706
DOI:
10.1016/j.rehab.2009.02.006
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free full text

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center