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Public Health Nutr. 2009 Nov;12(11):2199-208. doi: 10.1017/S1368980009005801. Epub 2009 May 28.

Impact evaluation of the Northern Fruit and Vegetable Pilot Programme - a cluster-randomised controlled trial.

Author information

1
Public Health Research, Education and Development (PHRED) Programme, Ontario, Canada. drmeizihe@gmail.com

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

The purpose of this impact evaluation was to measure the influence of a government of Ontario, Canada health promotion initiative, the Northern Fruit and Vegetable Pilot Programme (NFVPP), on elementary school-aged children's psychosocial variables regarding fruit and vegetables, and fruit and vegetable consumption patterns.

DESIGN:

A cluster-randomised controlled trial design was used. The NFVPP consisted of three intervention arms: (i) Intervention I: Free Fruit and Vegetable Snack (FFVS) + Enhanced Nutrition Education; (ii) Intervention II: FFVS-alone; and (iii) Control group. Using the Pro-Children Questionnaire, the primary outcome measure was children's fruit and vegetable consumption, and the secondary outcome measures included differences in children's awareness, knowledge, self-efficacy, preference, intention and willingness to increase fruit and vegetable consumption.

SETTING/SUBJECTS:

Twenty-six elementary schools in a defined area of Northern Ontario were eligible to participate in the impact evaluation. A final sample size of 1,277 students in grades five to eight was achieved.

RESULTS:

Intervention I students consumed more fruit and vegetables at school than their Control counterparts by 0.49 serving/d (P < 0.05). Similarly, Intervention II students consumed more fruit and vegetables at school than Control students by 0.42 serving/d, although this difference was not statistically significant. Among students in both intervention groups, preferences for certain fruit and vegetables shifted from 'never tried it' towards 'like it'.

CONCLUSIONS:

The NFVPP resulted in positive changes in elementary school-aged children's fruit and vegetable consumption at school, and favourable preference changes for certain fruit and vegetables.

PMID:
19476675
DOI:
10.1017/S1368980009005801
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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