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Nicotine Tob Res. 2009 Jul;11(7):812-22. doi: 10.1093/ntr/ntp067. Epub 2009 May 27.

Attentional bias modification in tobacco smokers.

Author information

1
School of Psychology, University of Liverpool, Liverpool L69 7ZA, UK. mfield@liverpool.ac.uk

Abstract

INTRODUCTION:

We examined whether an attentional bias modification (ABM) procedure would produce a persistent and generalizable change in attentional bias, and influence subjective craving and tobacco-seeking behavior, among tobacco smokers.

METHODS:

Seventy-two cigarette smokers were randomly allocated to groups before completing a modified visual probe task in which their attentional bias for smoking-related cues was increased ("attend smoking" group), reduced ("avoid smoking" group), or not manipulated (control group).

RESULTS:

The ABM produced the predicted changes in attentional bias, although these effects were short lasting, and there was no evidence of generalization either to novel smoking-related stimuli or to performance on a different measure of attentional bias (the pictorial Stroop task). ABM had no effects on subjective craving or behavioral measures of tobacco seeking.

DISCUSSION:

These results add to a growing body of literature that suggests that a single session of ABM does not produce generalizable effects, and effects on craving and drug seeking are inconsistent across studies. Theoretical implications and directions for future research are discussed.

PMID:
19474181
DOI:
10.1093/ntr/ntp067
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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