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Plant J. 2009 Sep;59(6):974-86. doi: 10.1111/j.1365-313X.2009.03924.x. Epub 2009 May 18.

A rapid wound signal activates the systemic synthesis of bioactive jasmonates in Arabidopsis.

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1
Department of Energy Plant Research Laboratory, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824, USA.

Abstract

Jasmonic acid (JA) and its biologically active derivatives (bioactive JAs) perform a critical role in regulating plant responses to wound stress. The perception of bioactive JAs by the F-box protein COI1 triggers the SCF(COI1)/ubiquitin-dependent degradation of JASMONATE ZIM-DOMAIN (JAZ) proteins that repress the expression of JA-response genes. JA is required for many wound-inducible systemic defense responses, but little is known about the role of the hormone in long-distance signal relay between damaged and undamaged leaves. Here, we show that the wounding of Arabidopsis thaliana leaves results in the rapid (<5 min) accumulation of jasmonoyl-l-isoleucine (JA-Ile), the bioactive form of JA, in leaves distal to the wound site. The rapid systemic increase in JA-Ile preceded the onset of early transcriptional responses, and was associated with JAZ degradation. Wound-induced systemic production of JA-Ile required the JA biosynthetic enzyme 12-oxo-phytodienoic acid (OPDA) reductase 3 (OPR3) in undamaged responding leaves, but not in wounded leaves, and was largely dependent on the JA-conjugating enzyme JAR1. Interestingly, the wound-induced synthesis of JA/JA-Ile in systemic leaves was correlated with a rapid decline in OPDA levels. These results are consistent with a model in which a rapidly transmitted wound signal triggers the systemic synthesis of JA, which, upon conversion to JA-Ile, activates the expression of early response genes by the SCF(COI1)/JAZ pathway.

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