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J Cataract Refract Surg. 2009 Jun;35(6):1082-6. doi: 10.1016/j.jcrs.2009.01.026.

Incidence of rainbow glare after laser in situ keratomileusis flap creation with a 60 kHz femtosecond laser.

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1
Department of Refractive Surgery, Cole Eye Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio 44195, USA.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

To report the incidence of and factors associated with rainbow glare after laser in situ keratomileusis (LASIK) flap creation with a 60 kHz femtosecond laser.

SETTING:

Department of Refractive Surgery, Cleveland Clinic Cole Eye Institute, Cleveland, Ohio, USA.

METHODS:

Consecutive patients having LASIK by the same surgeon were questioned during postoperative examinations or by telephone about postoperative rainbow glare (radiating colors around a white light at night). Femtosecond laser (IntraLase) settings included pulse frequency 60 kHz, flap thickness 90 to 110 mum, and spot/line separation 8 mum. Raster energy was 0.8 microJ (75% of eyes) and 1.0 to 1.1 microJ (25%). Excimer laser ablation was performed with the LADAR 4000 or 6000 platform using custom or conventional treatments.

RESULTS:

Of 260 consecutive patients, 256 (98.5%) were successfully contacted. Fifteen patients (28 eyes) reported postoperative rainbow glare (5.8%), described as 4 to 12 bands of color around a white light, with 6 bands most common. The symptom did not correlate with refractive error, age, or sex but was more frequent at 1.0 microJ or 1.1 microJ raster energy (11.6%) than at 0.8 microJ (4.1%). The incidence followed a bimodal distribution, with the first grouping due to inadequate alignment and higher energy just after laser installation and the second just before a later maintenance service call.

CONCLUSION:

Rainbow glare is a mild optical side effect of femtosecond LASIK. In this study, higher raster energy levels and length of time between service calls were associated with the occurrence of rainbow glare.

PMID:
19465295
DOI:
10.1016/j.jcrs.2009.01.026
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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