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Am J Drug Alcohol Abuse. 2009;35(3):193-8. doi: 10.1080/00952990902933860.

Cocaine dependence and concurrent marijuana use: a comparison of clinical characteristics.

Author information

1
Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, University of Texas, Houston, Texas, USA. Jan.A.Lindsay@uth.tmc.edu

Abstract

BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES:

Marijuana is the most commonly used illicit substance, yet among the least studied in medication development research. Cocaine-dependent individuals frequently also use marijuana; however, little is known about the effect of this combined use on treatment presentation.

METHODS:

Marijuana use was assessed in 1183 individuals seeking outpatient treatment for cocaine dependence. Based on past 30 days of use, the sample was divided into three groups: (1) patients reporting no recent marijuana use (n = 634); (2) occasional use (n = 403); (3) and frequent concurrent marijuana use (n = 146). Differences on baseline measures of substance use, addiction severity (ASI), psychopathology, and sociodemographic characteristics were examined as a function of level of marijuana use.

RESULTS:

Frequent marijuana users were more likely to be female, Caucasian, and younger than other groups. Cocaine-dependent patients with frequent marijuana use also used more cocaine and alcohol, and reported more medical, legal, and psychiatric problems, including antisocial personality disorder.

CONCLUSION AND SCIENTIFIC SIGNIFICANCE:

Cocaine-dependent patients with frequent marijuana use present for treatment with more severe impairment. Accounting for this heterogeneity among participants may improve treatment outcome.

PMID:
19462304
PMCID:
PMC3788597
DOI:
10.1080/00952990902933860
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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