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Cardiovasc Res. 2009 Sep 1;83(4):707-16. doi: 10.1093/cvr/cvp159. Epub 2009 May 20.

Human cardiac mesoangioblasts isolated from hypertrophic cardiomyopathies are greatly reduced in proliferation and differentiation potency.

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  • 1Division of Regenerative Medicine, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, 58 Via Olgettina, 20132 Milan, Italy. bggalvez@hotmail.com

Abstract

AIMS:

Our objective was to test whether progenitor cell proliferation and differentiation potential may vary depending upon the disease of the donor.

METHODS AND RESULTS:

Human cardiac mesoangioblasts were isolated from cardiac muscle biopsies of patients undergoing open heart surgery for correction of mitral regurgitation following an acute myocardial infarction (MR-MI) or correction of mitral and aortic regurgitation with ensuing left ventricular hypertrophy (MAR-LVH). The cells express surface markers and cardiac genes similar to mouse cardiac mesoangioblasts; they have limited self-renewing and clonogenic activity and are committed mainly to cardiogenesis. Although cardiac differentiation can be induced by 5-azacytidine or by co-culture with rat neonatal cardiomyocytes, human cells do not contract spontaneously like their mouse counterparts. When locally injected in the infarcted myocardium of immunodeficient mice, cardiac mesoangioblasts generate a chimeric heart that contains human myocytes and some capillaries; likewise, they colonize chick embryo hearts when transplanted in ovo. At variance with cells from patients with MR-MI, when isolation was performed on biopsies from MAR-LVH, cells could be isolated in much lower numbers, proliferated less extensively and failed to differentiate.

CONCLUSION:

Cardiac mesoangioblasts are present in the human heart but this endogenous progenitor population is progressively exhausted, possibly by continuous and inefficient regeneration attempts.

PMID:
19457891
DOI:
10.1093/cvr/cvp159
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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