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J Urol. 2009 Jul;182(1):215-20. doi: 10.1016/j.juro.2009.02.123. Epub 2009 May 17.

A possible relationship between testosterone and lower urinary tract symptoms in men.

Author information

1
Department of Urology, Chung-Ang University, College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

In this study we searched for possible associations between serum testosterone levels and the severity of lower urinary tract symptoms in men.

MATERIALS AND METHODS:

In 278 patients with a mean age of 62 years blood levels of total testosterone, albumin, sex hormone-binding globulin, fasting glucose, fasting insulin and high sensitivity C-reactive protein were measured. Free testosterone, bioavailable testosterone and homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance were calculated. Prostate volume was measured by transrectal ultrasonography and the severity of lower urinary tract symptoms was assessed using the International Prostate Symptom Score.

RESULTS:

Calculated free testosterone and bioavailable testosterone were negatively related to International Prostate Symptom Score total scores and subscores (voiding symptoms) after adjusting for age, prostate volume, high sensitivity C-reactive protein and homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (p <0.05). In addition, calculated free testosterone and bioavailable testosterone were significantly related to the presence of severe lower urinary tract symptoms (International Prostate Symptom Score 20 or greater) using unadjusted and adjusted models (p <0.05), although the odds ratio of bioavailable testosterone was lower than that of calculated free testosterone on multivariate analysis. High sensitivity C-reactive protein was negatively correlated with serum total testosterone (r = -0.128, p = 0.038) and bioavailable testosterone (r = -0.126, p = 0.041), and homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance was negatively correlated with serum total testosterone (r = -0.236, p <0.001), calculated free testosterone (r = -0.179, p = 0.003) and bioavailable testosterone (r = -0.162, r = 0.007). However, no significant correlation was found between high sensitivity C-reactive protein or homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance, and International Prostate Symptom Score total scores, voiding symptoms scores and storage symptoms scores.

CONCLUSIONS:

Our findings support the favorable role of endogenous testosterone in lower urinary tract function and suggest that testosterone deficiency may be a pathophysiological mechanism connecting lower urinary tract symptoms and the metabolic syndrome in men.

PMID:
19447426
DOI:
10.1016/j.juro.2009.02.123
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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