Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Nephrol Dial Transplant. 2009 Sep;24(9):2809-16. doi: 10.1093/ndt/gfp212. Epub 2009 May 14.

Prescription of antihypertensive agents to haemodialysis patients: time trends and associations with patient characteristics, country and survival in the DOPPS.

Author information

1
Faculdade de Medicina da Bahia da Universidade Federal da Bahia, Salvador, Brazil.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Haemodialysis patients were studied in 12 countries to identify practice patterns of prescription of antihypertensive agents (AHA) associated with survival.

METHODS:

The sample included 28 513 patients enrolled in DOPPS I and II. The classes of AHA studied were beta blocker (BB), angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor (ACEI), angiotensin receptor blocker (ARB), peripheral blocker, central antagonist, vasodilator, long-acting dihydropyridine calcium channel blocker (CCB), short-acting dihydropyridine CCB and non-dihydropyridine CCB. To reduce bias due to unmeasured confounders, the associations with mortality were assessed by separate Cox models based on patient-level prescription and facility prescription practice.

RESULTS:

An increase in prescription of ARBs (9.5%) and BBs (9.1%) was observed from DOPPS I to II. Prescription of AHA classes varied significantly by country, ranging for BBs from 9.7% in Japan to 52.7% in Sweden and for ARBs from 5.5% in Italy to 21.3% in Japan in DOPPS II. Facilities that treated 10% more patients with ARBs had, on average, 7% lower all-cause mortality, independent of patient characteristics and the prescription patterns of other antihypertensive medications (P = 0.05). Significant and independent associations with reduction in cardiovascular mortality were observed for ARBs (RR = 0.79; P = 0.005) and BBs (RR = 0.87, P = 0.004) in analyses of patient-level prescriptions. These associations in the facility-level model followed the same direction.

CONCLUSIONS:

DOPPS data show large variations across countries in AHA prescription for haemodialysis patients. The data suggest an association between ARB use and reduction in all-cause mortality, as well as with the use of BBs and reduction in cardiovascular mortality among haemodialysis patients.

PMID:
19443648
DOI:
10.1093/ndt/gfp212
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Silverchair Information Systems
    Loading ...
    Support Center