Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
J Neurol Sci. 2009 Sep 15;284(1-2):209-10. doi: 10.1016/j.jns.2009.04.037. Epub 2009 May 13.

Stroke due to septic embolism resulting from Aspergillus aortitis in an immunocompetent patient.

Author information

1
Neurology Department, Hospital Universitario La Paz, Paseo de la Castellana 261, 28046, Madrid, Spain. mariajoaa@yahoo.es

Abstract

INTRODUCTION:

Cerebral infarction secondary to Aspergillus arteritis or septic embolism is an exceptional finding. We present a case of multiple systemic embolism and cerebral infarction resulting from Aspergillus aortitis in an immunocompetent patient.

PATIENT:

A 65-year-old male with hypertension, hyperglycaemia and myocardial infarction with aorto-coronary by-pass surgery three years before admission, that suffered cerebral infarction in middle right cerebral artery territory and right cubital artery embolism. One month later he presented abrupt increase of his left hemiparesia and left central facial palsy associated with fever of unknown origin. Laboratory test, cranial CT and echocardiogram were performed. He died ten days later.

RESULTS:

Hemogram: leucocytes 34.700/microL (85% N, 4.8%L). Cranial CT: cerebral infarction in middle right cerebral artery territory. Transthoracic and transesophageal echocardiogram: moderate left ventricular hypertrophy and slight inferior hypokinesis. Arteriography: complete thrombosis of the left internal carotid. Necropsy: parietal aortic aspergillosis with generalized septic embolisms (brain, kidney, liver, fingers), cerebral infarction in middle right cerebral artery territory and thrombosis of the left carotid siphon with Aspergillus arteritis.

CONCLUSIONS:

Aspergillosis is an exceptional cause of cerebral infarction, especially in immunocompetent patients, and their diagnosis is complicated, being usually found at necropsy.

PMID:
19442990
DOI:
10.1016/j.jns.2009.04.037
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Elsevier Science
    Loading ...
    Support Center