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Environ Health Perspect. 2009 Apr;117(4):660-7. doi: 10.1289/ehp.11681. Epub 2008 Nov 4.

Correlations between prenatal exposure to perfluorinated chemicals and reduced fetal growth.

Author information

1
Department of Public Health, Hokkaido University Graduate School of Medicine, Sapporo, Japan.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) and perfluorooctanoate (PFOA) are man-made, ubiquitous, and persistent contaminants in the environment, wildlife, and humans. Although recent studies have shown that these chemicals interfere with fetal growth in humans, the results are inconsistent.

OBJECTIVES:

Our goal was to investigate the correlation between relatively low levels of PFOS and PFOA in maternal serum and birth weight and birth size.

METHODS:

We conducted a hospital-based prospective cohort study between July 2002 and October 2005 in Sapporo, Japan. A total of 428 women and their infants were involved in the study. We obtained characteristics of the mothers and infants from self-administered questionnaire surveys and from medical records. We analyzed maternal serum samples for PFOS and PFOA by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS).

RESULTS:

After adjusting for confounding factors, PFOS levels negatively correlated with birth weight [per log10 unit: beta = -148.8 g; 95% confidence interval (CI), -297.0 to -0.5 g]. In addition, analyses stratified by sex revealed that PFOS levels negatively correlated with birth weight only in female infants (per log10 unit: beta = -269.4 g; 95% CI, -465.7 to -73.0 g). However, we observed no correlation between PFOA levels and birth weight.

CONCLUSION:

Our results indicate that in utero exposure to relatively low levels of PFOS was negatively correlated with birth weight.

KEYWORDS:

birth weight; chest circumference; fetal growth; head circumference; length; perfluorinated chemicals; perfluorooctane sulfonate; perfluorooctanoate; prenatal exposure

PMID:
19440508
PMCID:
PMC2679613
DOI:
10.1289/ehp.11681
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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