Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
ISME J. 2009 Sep;3(9):1004-11. doi: 10.1038/ismej.2009.47. Epub 2009 May 14.

Changes in land use alter the structure of bacterial communities in Western Amazon soils.

Author information

  • 1Center for Microbial Ecology, Michigan State University, MI 48824, USA. ederson@msu.edu

Erratum in

  • ISME J. 2009 Oct;3(10):1222.

Abstract

Here we show how agricultural practices by indigenous peoples as well as forest recovery relate to the structure and composition of Amazon soil bacterial communities. Soil samples were collected in different land use systems and bacterial community composition and diversity were explored by T-RFLP, cloning and sequencing, and data were analyzed with multivariate techniques. The main differences in bacterial community structure were related to changes in the soil attributes that, in turn, were correlated to land use. Community structure changed significantly along gradients of base saturation, [Al3+] and pH. The relationship with soil attributes accounted for about 31% of the variation of the studied communities. Clear differences were observed in community composition as shown by the differential distribution of Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Firmicutes, Acidobacteria and Actinobacteria. Similarity between primary and secondary forest communities indicates the recovery of bacterial community structure during succession. Pasture and crop soil communities were among the most diverse, showing that these land use types did not deplete bacterial diversity under the conditions found in our sites.

PMID:
19440233
DOI:
10.1038/ismej.2009.47
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Publication Types, MeSH Terms, Substances, Secondary Source ID

Publication Types

MeSH Terms

Substances

Secondary Source ID

PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Nature Publishing Group
    Loading ...
    Support Center