Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Asian J Surg. 2009 Apr;32(2):85-8. doi: 10.1016/S1015-9584(09)60016-6.

Deep venous thrombosis in surgical intensive care unit: prevalence and risk factors.

Author information

1
Department of Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, Ramathibodi Hospital, Mahidol University, Bangkok, Thailand. racwl@mahidol.ac.th

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Critically ill patients are at high risk for developing venous thromboembolism. The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence of, and risk factors for, lower extremity deep vein thrombosis (DVT) among critically ill surgical patients in Thailand.

MATERIALS AND METHODS:

Patients older than 15 years who were admitted to a surgical intensive care unit (ICU) of a tertiary care hospital were enrolled. Bilateral lower extremity compression Doppler ultrasonographic examination was performed to detect DVT within 14 days of ICU admission. Demographic data, primary disease, operative intervention, co-morbidities, acute physiology and chronic health evaluation (APACHE) II score and the length of ICU stay were tested for association with the presence of DVT.

RESULTS:

Among the 190 first-time admitted ICU patients with a mean APACHE II score of 9.2 +/- 6.0 (range, 0-29), 20 patients had DVT (prevalence of 10.5%). Thromboprophylaxis was not given to any patient. The only independent and significant risk factor for DVT was a longer ICU stay. Age, sex, APACHE II score, presence of comorbidities and operative intervention were not associated with the presence of DVT.

CONCLUSION:

The prevalence of DVT in critically ill patients in a Thai surgical ICU was approximately 10.5%. Further research is needed to evaluate the risks and benefits of venous thromboprophylaxis in Thai patients.

PMID:
19423454
DOI:
10.1016/S1015-9584(09)60016-6
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free full text
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Elsevier Science
    Loading ...
    Support Center