Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Int J Cardiol. 2010 Oct 8;144(2):206-11. doi: 10.1016/j.ijcard.2009.04.019. Epub 2009 May 2.

Inflammation in right ventricular dysfunction due to thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension.

Author information

1
Department of Medicine II, Johannes Gutenberg-University, Mainz, Germany.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES AND BACKGROUND:

Activation of the immune system is well established in patients with chronic heart failure (CHF) and impaired left ventricular function. High levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines are associated with a poor prognosis. Chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH) frequently leads to impaired right ventricular function. It is not known whether such patients display chronic immune activation as well.

METHODS AND RESULTS:

We studied 49 patients with CTEPH (50±2 years, right ventricular ejection fraction [RVEF] 29±2%, left ventricular ejection fraction [LVEF] 51±3%, mean±SEM) and compared their results with 17 patients with CHF (71±2 years, LVEF 23±1%) and 34 age-matched control subjects (age 57±2 years). We studied serum levels of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα), its soluble receptors 1 and 2 (sTNFR1 and 2), interleukin-10 (IL-10) and plasma N-terminal-pro-B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP). Serum TNFα was not different in CTEPH compared with CHF patients (p=0.67) but both their levels were significantly higher than in controls (both p<0.001). Similar results were obtained for sTNFR1, sTNFR2, and IL-10. Levels of NT-proBNP were not different in patients with CTEPH or CHF (p=0.54), but significantly higher than in control subjects (both p<0.001). There were significant correlations between RVEF as assessed by magnetic resonance imaging and sTNFR1, sTNFR2, IL-6, high sensitivity C-reactive protein, and NT-proBNP (all p<0.05) in patients with CTEPH.

CONCLUSION:

Similar levels of immune activation as reflected by high levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines are present in patients with isolated right ventricular dysfunction due to CTEPH and patients with CHF and left ventricular dysfunction.

PMID:
19411119
DOI:
10.1016/j.ijcard.2009.04.019
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center