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Ann R Coll Surg Engl. 2009 Jul;91(5):385-8. doi: 10.1308/003588409X428270. Epub 2009 Apr 30.

Feeding patients following pancreaticoduodenectomy: a UK national survey.

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1
The Royal Surrey County Hospital, Guildford, Surrey, UK.

Abstract

INTRODUCTION:

Providing nutrition for patients following pancreaticoduodenectomy (PD) is vital but can be challenging. Due to the lack of UK national guidelines for the provision of nutrition and nutritional pre-operative assessment regarding PD, a national survey was conducted.

PATIENTS AND METHODS:

A questionnaire was sent to the Department of Nutrition and Dietetics at each of the 31 specialist pancreatic centres listed with the Pancreatic Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Questions were asked regarding the nutritional assessment and treatment of patients undergoing classical PD and pylorus-preserving PD (PPPD) resections.

RESULTS:

Twenty-two centres responded to the questionnaire. With regard to PD and PPPD, 82% routinely feed patients following resection, 32% have a regimen for staring feeds, 18% carry out pre-operative nutritional assessment, five centres have funding for an hepatobiliary dietition, and only four centres have a specialist hepatobiliary dietition employed. There was no consensus regarding the type or route of feeding, and at least one centre reported using parenteral nutrition exclusively.

CONCLUSIONS:

Very few centres in the UK have funding for a hepatobiliary dietition. Hence pre-operative nutritional assessment in patients undergoing PD and PPPD does not receive much input. Although the importance of postoperative feeding in these patients is appreciated in all major units, there is no consensus with regards to feeding regimens. The authors hope this observational study will address these issues with this important message and stimulate further study in this area.

PMID:
19409147
PMCID:
PMC2758432
DOI:
10.1308/003588409X428270
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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