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Cogn Affect Behav Neurosci. 2009 Jun;9(2):202-15. doi: 10.3758/CABN.9.2.202.

Anticipatory reconfiguration elicited by fully and partially informative cues that validly predict a switch in task.

Author information

1
Functional Neuroimaging Laboratory, School of Psychology, University of Newcastle, Callaghan, New South Wales, Australia. frini.karayanidis@newcastle.edu.au

Abstract

Task-switching studies show no behavioral benefit of partially informative cues. However, ERP evidence of an early cue-locked positivity elicited by both fully and partially informative cues suggests that both cues trigger an anticipatory component of task set reconfiguration (Nicholson, Karayanidis, Davies, & Michie, 2006). We examined this apparent discrepancy using a cued-trials task-switching paradigm with three tasks. The ERP finding of an early cue-locked positivity was replicated for both switch-to cues, which validly predicted an upcoming switch trial and specified the new task set, and switch-away cues, which validly predicted an upcoming switch trial but not the new task set. This component was not elicited by a noninformative cue that did not specify whether the task would switch or repeat. Switch-away cues resulted in more accurate but not faster responding than did noninformative cues. Modeling of decision processes confirmed a speed-accuracy trade-off between these conditions and a preparation benefit for both switch-to and switch-away cues. These results indicate that both fully and partially informative cues elicit an early anticipatory component of task set reconfiguration that is reflected in the early cue-locked positivity. We argue that the pattern of results is most consistent with a task set inhibition account of this early anticipatory component of task set reconfiguration.

PMID:
19403896
DOI:
10.3758/CABN.9.2.202
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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