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J Am Coll Cardiol. 1991 Nov 15;18(6):1463-70.

Absence of myocardial dysfunction during stress in patients with syndrome X.

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1
Department of Medicine, Hammersmith Hospital, RPMS, London, England.

Abstract

Stress two-dimensional echocardiographic studies were performed in 18 patients with angina, a positive exercise test and normal findings on coronary angiography (syndrome X). Rest and immediate posttreadmill exercise two-dimensional echocardiograms were performed with a digitized cine loop and side by side visual analysis in all patients. In 16 of these patients, right atrial pacing up to 160 beats/min was also performed and percent systolic wall thickening was calculated at five equally spaced segments around the left ventricle, each corresponding to an anterior, lateral and inferior wall and the posterior and the anterior ventricular septum. Measurements of percent systolic wall thickening were established in 10 age- and gender-matched normal persons for comparison. ST segment depression occurred in all patients during exercise and persisted for 42.1 s (range 18 to 75) into the recovery period. Immediate postexercise echocardiography was started within 20.1 +/- 5.4 s and completed in 54.1 +/- 11.3 s. No patient had regional wall motion abnormalities seen on two-dimensional imaging of any myocardial segment. Thirteen patients (72%) reported reproduction of their usual chest pain, which led to termination of the test. During rapid right atrial pacing, nine patients (56%) developed ST segment depression that was associated with angina in seven. In all 16 patients, percent systolic wall thickening increased over values at rest in each myocardial segment. Percent systolic wall thickening averaged 47.1 +/- 6.1% at rest and increased to 74 +/- 8% during right atrial pacing (p less than 0.001).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS).

PMID:
1939947
DOI:
10.1016/0735-1097(91)90676-z
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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