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Eur J Cell Biol. 2009 Jul;88(7):397-408. doi: 10.1016/j.ejcb.2009.03.001. Epub 2009 Apr 22.

The germline stem cells of Drosophila melanogaster partition DNA non-randomly.

Author information

1
Department of Medical Genetics and Microbiology, University of Toronto, 160 College Street, Toronto, Ontario, Canada M5S 3E1. phillip.karpowicz@utoronto.ca

Abstract

The Immortal Strand Hypothesis proposes that asymmetrically dividing stem cells cosegregate chromatids to retain ancestral DNA templates. Using both pulse-chase and label retention assays, we show that non-random partitioning of DNA occurs in germline stem cells (GSCs) in the Drosophila ovary as these divide asymmetrically to generate a new GSC and a differentiating cystoblast. This process is disrupted when GSCs are forced to differentiate through the overexpression of Bag of Marbles, a factor that impels the terminal differentiation of cystoblasts. When Decapentaplegic, a ligand which maintains the undifferentiated state of GSCs, is expressed ectopically the non-random partitioning of DNA is similarly disrupted. Our data suggest asymmetric chromatid segregation is coupled to mechanisms specifying cellular differentiation via asymmetric stem cell division.

PMID:
19395121
DOI:
10.1016/j.ejcb.2009.03.001
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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