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Eye (Lond). 2010 Feb;24(2):315-7. doi: 10.1038/eye.2009.81. Epub 2009 Apr 24.

A comparison of induced astigmatism in 20- vs 25-gauge vitrectomy procedures.

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1
Department of Vitreoretinal Surgery, Vision Retinal Institute, Queensland, Australia.

Abstract

INTRODUCTION:

Surgically induced astigmatism is an unwanted variable that can lead to poorer visual and refractive outcomes in patients undergoing vitrectomy even when a technically precise procedure has been performed. This study assesses the difference in surgically induced astigmatism (SIA) between the traditional 20-gauge vitrectomy and the newer 25-gauge sutureless technique by comparing pre- and post-procedure keratometry readings.

METHOD:

The study is a retrospective consecutive case series of vitrectomies performed by a single surgeon. There were a total of 47 patients, eight with bilateral procedures, 24 who underwent the 20 gauge, and 31 who had the 25-gauge procedure. Patients were excluded for corneal altering pathology or scleral buckling procedures. Vector analysis of pre- and post-vitrectomy readings was performed using Alpin's method, facilitated by the ASSORT program version 4.1.

RESULTS:

Mean time at which post-operative keratometry readings were taken was 3.9 months (1-36). Mean astigmatism at presentation was 0.63 D and 0.92 D and at post-surgically follow-up 1.14 D and 0.91 D (20 and 25 gauge, respectively). Mean SIA was 0.66 D (SD=0.8 D) for the 20-gauge group and 0.27 D (SD=0.23 D) for the 25 gauge (P=0.037). The calculated figure of SIA variability representing the 95% CI for the maximum amount of SIA for each procedure was 2.26 D and 0.73 D for the 20- and 25-gauge procedure, respectively.

CONCLUSIONS:

The study shows that the 25-gauge technique involves a statistically significant reduction in the amount of SIA. This can ultimately lead to a better visual and refractive outcome for the patient.

PMID:
19390563
DOI:
10.1038/eye.2009.81
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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