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Appetite. 2009 Jun;52(3):809-812. doi: 10.1016/j.appet.2009.04.003. Epub 2009 Apr 21.

Relationship between diet-induced changes in body fat and appetite sensations in women.

Author information

1
Division of Kinesiology, Department of Social and Preventive Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Laval University, Quebec City, Quebec, Canada G1K 7P4. Electronic address: jo-anne.gilbert@kin.msp.ulaval.ca.
2
Department of Physical Education, Faculty of Education, Laval University, Quebec City, Quebec, Canada G1K 7P4. Electronic address: vicky.drapeau@fse.ulaval.ca.
3
Department of Human Nutrition, Faculty of Life Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Rolighedsvej 30, DK-1958 Frederiksberg C, Denmark. Electronic address: ast@life.ku.dk.
4
Division of Kinesiology, Department of Social and Preventive Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Laval University, Quebec City, Quebec, Canada G1K 7P4. Electronic address: angelo.tremblay@kin.msp.ulaval.ca.

Abstract

To quantify the impact of weight/fat loss on appetite sensations, 54 overweight women followed a caloric restriction program (-2900 kJ/day). Their body composition and appetite sensations were assessed. Visual analogue scales (VAS) were used to measure desire to eat, hunger, fullness and prospective food consumption. The results showed that there is a significant association between the decrease in body fat mass and the change in appetite sensations, predicting a 5.8-mm increase in desire to eat and a 3.6-mm decrease in fullness per kg fat loss. This quantified relationship could serve as a reference point to evaluate the satiating efficiency of functional foods when they are combined with a weight-reducing program.

PMID:
19389439
DOI:
10.1016/j.appet.2009.04.003
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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