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J Clin Psychiatry. 2009 Apr 21;70(5):732-40. doi: 10.4088/JCP.08m04821.

The Child Behavior Checklist-Pediatric Bipolar Disorder profile predicts a subsequent diagnosis of bipolar disorder and associated impairments in ADHD youth growing up: a longitudinal analysis.

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1
Clinical and Research Program in Pediatric Psychopharmacology, Yawkey Center, Suite 6A, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA 02114, USA. jbiederman@partners.org

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To examine the predictive utility of the Child Behavior Checklist-Pediatric Bipolar Disorder (CBCL-PBD) profile to help identify children at risk for bipolar disorder.

METHOD:

Subjects were ascertained from 2 identically designed longitudinal case-control family studies of subjects (males and females aged 6-18 years) with DSM-III-R attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Based on data from the baseline assessment, ADHD subjects without a lifetime diagnosis of bipolar disorder were stratified by the presence (CBCL-PBD positive, N=28) or absence (CBCL-PBD negative, N=176) of a CBCL-PBD score > or = 210 (total of attention, aggression, and anxious/depressed subscales). Subjects were comprehensively assessed at follow-up with structured psychiatric interviews. Data were collected from April 1988 to February 2003.

RESULTS:

Over a mean follow-up period of 7.4 years, a positive CBCL-PBD score predicted subsequent diagnoses of bipolar disorder, major depressive disorder, and conduct disorder, as well as impaired psychosocial functioning and higher risk for psychiatric hospitalization.

CONCLUSION:

This work suggests that a positive CBCL-PBD score based on elevations on the attention problems, aggressive behavior, and anxious/depressed subscales predicts subsequent pediatric bipolar disorder and associated syndrome-congruent impairments. If confirmed in other studies, the CBCL-PBD score has the potential to help identify children at high risk to develop bipolar disorder.

PMID:
19389330
PMCID:
PMC3066229
DOI:
10.4088/JCP.08m04821
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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