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Clin Orthop Relat Res. 2009 Nov;467(11):2825-30. doi: 10.1007/s11999-009-0844-4. Epub 2009 Apr 22.

The Friedman-Eilber resection arthroplasty of the pelvis.

Author information

1
Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, University of California, Los Angeles Medical Center, Santa Monica, 1250 16th Street, 7th Floor, Los Angeles, CA, 90404, USA. adamschwartz2001@yahoo.com

Abstract

It has been argued that internal hemipelvectomy without reconstruction of the pelvic ring leads to poor ambulation and inferior patient acceptance. To determine the accuracy of this contention, we posed the following questions: First, how effectively does a typical patient ambulate following this procedure? Second, what is the typical functional capacity of a patient following internal hemipelvectomy? In the spring of 2006, we obtained video documentation of eight patients who had undergone resection arthroplasty of the hemipelvis seen in our clinic during routine clinical followup. The minimum followup in 2006 was 1.1 years (mean, 8.2 years; range, 1.1-22.7 years); at the time of last followup in 2008 the minimum followup was 2.9 years (mean, 9.8 years; range, 2.9-24.5 years). At last followup seven of the eight patients were without pain, and were able to walk without supports. The remaining patient used narcotic medication and a cane or crutch only occasionally. The mean MSTS score at the time of most recent followup was 73.3% of normal (range 53.3-80.0%; mean raw score was 22.0; range 16-24). All eight patients ultimately returned to gainful employment. These observations demonstrate independent painless ambulation and acceptable function is possible following resection arthroplasty of the hemipelvis.

LEVEL OF EVIDENCE:

Level IV, case series. See Guidelines for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence.

PMID:
19384561
PMCID:
PMC2758972
DOI:
10.1007/s11999-009-0844-4
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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