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Am J Surg. 2009 Jun;197(6):820-5; discussion 826-7. doi: 10.1016/j.amjsurg.2008.05.013. Epub 2009 Apr 17.

Cost and workforce implications of subjecting all physicians to aviation industry work-hour restrictions.

Author information

1
School of Medicine, University of Connecticut, Farmington, CT, USA. Michael.J.Payette.02@alum.dartmouth.org

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Efforts to improve patient safety have attempted to incorporate aviation industry safety standards. We sought to evaluate the cost and workforce implications of applying aviation duty-hour restrictions to the entire practicing physician workforce.

METHODS:

The work hours and personnel deficit for United States residents and practicing physicians that would be created by the adoption of aviation standards were calculated.

RESULTS:

Application of aviation standards to the resident workforce creates an estimated annual cost of $6.5 billion, requiring a 174% increase in the number of residents to meet the deficit. Its application to practicing physicians creates an additional annual cost of $80.4 billion, requiring a 71% increase in the physician workforce. Adding in the aviation industry's mandatory retirement age (65 years) increases annual costs by $10.5 billion. The cost per life-year saved would be $1,035,227.

CONCLUSIONS:

Application of aviation duty-hour restrictions to the United States health care system would be prohibitively costly. Alternate approaches for improving patient safety are warranted.

PMID:
19375063
DOI:
10.1016/j.amjsurg.2008.05.013
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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