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Ann Behav Med. 2009 Jun;37(3):315-24. doi: 10.1007/s12160-009-9090-y. Epub 2009 Apr 17.

The importance of supporting autonomy and perceived competence in facilitating long-term tobacco abstinence.

Author information

1
Department of Medicine, University of Rochester, R.C. Box 270266, Rochester, NY 14627-0266, USA. Geoffrey_Williams@URMC.Rochester.Edu

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

The Public Health Service (PHS) Guideline for Treating Tobacco Use and Dependence (Fiore et al. 2000) recommends supporting autonomy and perceived competence to facilitate tobacco abstinence.

PURPOSE:

The aim of the study was to evaluate the effectiveness of an intensive tobacco-dependence intervention based on self-determination theory (SDT) and intended to support autonomy and perceived competence in facilitating long-term tobacco abstinence.

METHODS:

One thousand and six adult smokers were recruited into a randomized cessation-induction trial. Community care participants received cessation pamphlets and information on local treatment programs. Intervention participants received the same materials and were asked to meet four times with counselors over 6 months to discuss their health in a manner intended to support autonomy and perceived competence. The primary outcome was 24-month prolonged abstinence from tobacco. The secondary outcome was 7-day point prevalence tobacco abstinence at 24 months postintervention.

RESULTS:

Smokers in the intervention were more likely to attain both tobacco abstinence outcomes and these effects were partially mediated by change in both autonomous self-regulation and perceived competence from baseline to 6 months. Structural equation modeling confirmed the SDT model of health-behavior change in facilitating long-term tobacco abstinence.

CONCLUSIONS:

An intervention based on SDT and consistent with the PHS Guideline, which was intended to support autonomy and perceived competence, facilitated long-term tobacco abstinence.

TRIAL REGISTRATION:

ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00178685.

PMID:
19373517
PMCID:
PMC2819097
DOI:
10.1007/s12160-009-9090-y
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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