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Pediatr Cardiol. 2009 May;30(4):397-403. doi: 10.1007/s00246-009-9422-5. Epub 2009 Apr 14.

Creation of transcatheter aortopulmonary and cavopulmonary shunts using magnetic catheters: feasibility study in swine.

Author information

1
Division of Pediatric Cardiology, Mattel Children's Hospital, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90095, USA. dlevi@ucla.edu

Abstract

Surgical shunts are the basic form of palliation for many types of congenital heart disease. The Glenn shunt (superior cavopulmonary connection) and central shunt (aortopulmonary connection) represent surgical interventions that could potentially be accomplished by transcatheter techniques. We sought to investigate the efficacy of using neodymium iron boron (NdFeB) magnetic catheters to create transcatheter cavopulmonary and aortopulmonary shunts. NdFeB magnets were machined and integrated into catheters. "Target" catheters were placed in the pulmonary arteries (PAs), and radiofrequency "perforation" catheters were placed in either the descending aorta (DAo) for central shunts or the superior vena cava (SVC) for Glenn shunts. The magnet technique or "balloon target" method was used to pass wires from the DAo or the SVC into the PA. Aortopulmonary and cavopulmonary connections were then created using Atrium iCAST covered stents. Magnet catheters were used to perforate the left pulmonary artery from the DAo, thereby establishing a transcatheter central shunt. Given the orientation of the vasculature, magnetic catheters could not be used for SVC-to-PA connections; however, perforation from the SVC to the right pulmonary artery was accomplished with a trans-septal needle and balloon target. Transcatheter Glenn or central shunts were successfully created in four swine.

PMID:
19365662
DOI:
10.1007/s00246-009-9422-5
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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