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Biochim Biophys Acta. 2009 Oct;1790(10):1133-8. doi: 10.1016/j.bbagen.2009.02.002. Epub 2009 Feb 10.

Modulating human aging and age-associated diseases.

Author information

1
Division of Geriatrics and Nutritional Science and Center for Human Nutrition, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO 63110, USA. lfontana@dom.wustl.edu

Abstract

Population aging is progressing rapidly in many industrialized countries. The United States population aged 65 and over is expected to double in size within the next 25 years. In sedentary people eating Western diets aging is associated with the development of serious chronic diseases, including type 2 diabetes mellitus, cancer and cardiovascular diseases. About 80% of adults over 65 years of age have at least one chronic disease, and 50% have at least two chronic diseases. These chronic diseases are the most important cause of illness and mortality burden, and they have become the leading driver of healthcare costs, constituting an important burden for our society. Data from epidemiological studies and clinical trials indicate that many age-associated chronic diseases can be prevented, and even reversed, with the implementation of healthy lifestyle interventions. Several recent studies suggest that more drastic interventions (i.e. calorie restriction without malnutrition and moderate protein restriction with adequate nutrition) may have additional beneficial effects on several metabolic and hormonal factors that are implicated in the biology of aging itself. Additional studies are needed to understand the complex interactions of factors that regulate aging and age-associated chronic disease.

PMID:
19364477
PMCID:
PMC2829866
DOI:
10.1016/j.bbagen.2009.02.002
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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