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Clin Pediatr (Phila). 2009 Jul;48(6):648-55. doi: 10.1177/0009922809334350. Epub 2009 Apr 10.

Developmental screening: is there enough time?

Author information

1
Division of General Pediatrics, Children's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts, Division of Developmental Medicine, Children's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. alison.schonwald@childrens.harvard.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends routine developmental screening in well-child care. Providers cite time restraints as a limitation preventing its widespread adoption. The objectives were to determine whether routine screening lengthened well-visits and was associated with changes in parent satisfaction and report of anticipatory guidance.

METHODS:

Visits before and after implementation of routine screening were timed. Parents whose children were seen before or after screening began were contacted to query their perceptions of the visit.

RESULTS:

There was no change in visit lengths after the screener was included. With screening, more parents reported their provider talked about their concerns, and that their questions were answered. There were no changes in parent satisfaction ratings or reports of anticipatory guidance discussions.

CONCLUSIONS:

The perceived obstacle that routine screening requires more time than pediatricians have should not prevent its adoption. Screening tools may empower some parents otherwise reluctant to raise concerns unsolicited.

PMID:
19363163
DOI:
10.1177/0009922809334350
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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