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Am J Ind Med. 2009 Jun;52(6):479-90. doi: 10.1002/ajim.20700.

Quantitative exposure-response relations between physical workload and prevalence of lateral epicondylitis in a working population.

Author information

1
Safety & Health Assessment and Research for Prevention (SHARP), Washington State Department of Labor & Industries, Olympia, Washington, USA. fanj235@LNI.wa.gov

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Lateral epicondylitis is a common work-related musculoskeletal disorder. The objective of this study was to identify risk factors associated with lateral epicondylitis among active workers.

METHODS:

Seven-hundred thirty-three workers in 12 Washington worksites participated in structured interviews, physical examinations, and individual exposure assessments of biomechanical and psychosocial factors. Multivariable logistic modeling was used.

RESULTS:

Thirty-eight subjects (5.2%) had lateral epicondylitis. Age (36-50 years-old), being female, and low social support at work were significant risk factors. Frequency of forceful exertion (> or =5 vs. < 1 times/min (OR 5.17, 95%CI 1.78-15.02), and > or =1 to <5 vs. <1 (OR 4.47, 95%CI 1.57-13.71)) and forearm supination at > or =45 degrees for > or =5% of the time with high lifting force (OR = 2.98, 95% CI 1.18-7.55) were significant physical load factors.

CONCLUSIONS:

Frequency of forceful exertion or a combination of forearm supination and forceful lifting were significant physical factors and should be considered for prevention strategies.

PMID:
19347903
DOI:
10.1002/ajim.20700
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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