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Pediatrics. 2009 Apr;123(4):1171-6. doi: 10.1542/peds.2008-0825.

Sleep problems in childhood predict neuropsychological functioning in adolescence.

Author information

1
Psychology Department, Goldsmiths College, University of London, Lewisham Way, New Cross, London SE14 6NW, United Kingdom. a.gregory@gold.ac.uk

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

Our goal was to examine the association between parent-rated sleep problems during childhood and neuropsychological functioning during adolescence.

PARTICIPANTS AND METHODS:

Longitudinal prospective data on an entire birth cohort from Dunedin, New Zealand, were obtained. One thousand thirty-seven children were enrolled in the study (52% male). Parents reported on sleep problems when the study members were 5, 7, and 9 years of age. Neuropsychological functioning was assessed by using 7 tests when the participants were 13 years of age.

RESULTS:

After adjusting for gender and socioeconomic status, persistent sleep problems during childhood predicted scores on 2 neuropsychological tests: the copy score of the Rey-Osterrieth Complex Figure Test and 2 measures of performance on the Halstead Trail Making Test. These results were substantively replicated when sleep was assessed at the 5- and 9-year (but not 7-year) assessments separately.

CONCLUSIONS:

Sleep problems during childhood may be associated with certain aspects of neuropsychological functioning during adolescence. This adds to the growing body of literature suggesting that childhood sleep problems may be a risk indicator of later difficulties.

PMID:
19336377
PMCID:
PMC3826614
DOI:
10.1542/peds.2008-0825
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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