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PLoS One. 2009;4(3):e5065. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0005065. Epub 2009 Mar 31.

Extensive HIV-1 intra-host recombination is common in tissues with abnormal histopathology.

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1
BioInfoExperts, Thibodaux, LA, USA.

Abstract

There is evidence that immune-activated macrophages infected with the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) are associated with tissue damage and serve as a long-lived viral reservoir during therapy. In this study, we analyzed 780 HIV genetic sequences generated from 53 tissues displaying normal and abnormal histopathology. We found up to 50% of the sequences from abnormal lymphoid and macrophage rich non-lymphoid tissues were intra-host viral recombinants. The presence of extensive recombination, especially in non-lymphoid tissues, implies that HIV-1 infected macrophages may significantly contribute to the generation of elusive viral genotypes in vivo. Because recombination has been implicated in immune evasion, the acquisition of drug-resistance mutations, and alterations of viral co-receptor usage, any attempt towards the successful eradication of HIV-1 requires therapeutic approaches targeting tissue macrophages.

PMID:
19333384
PMCID:
PMC2659430
DOI:
10.1371/journal.pone.0005065
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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