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Am J Ophthalmol. 2009 Jul;148(1):83-9.e1. doi: 10.1016/j.ajo.2009.01.017. Epub 2009 Mar 27.

Association between foveal photoreceptor integrity and visual outcome in neovascular age-related macular degeneration.

Author information

1
Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine, Sakyo, Kyoto, Japan.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

To evaluate the correlation between visual outcome and foveal photoreceptor integrity after successful treatment of eyes with neovascular age-related macular degeneration (AMD).

DESIGN:

Retrospective chart review.

METHODS:

We retrospectively studied the medical records of 51 eyes of 51 patients with neovascular AMD who were treated successfully with photodynamic therapy (PDT). All eyes were followed-up for more than 24 months after the initial treatment. Using spectral-domain optical coherence tomography, the status of the inner segment and outer segment (IS/OS) photoreceptor junction was assessed as a hallmark of the integrity of the foveal photoreceptor layer.

RESULTS:

At the final visit, no eyes showed an exudative change. A complete or discontinuous IS/OS line was detected beneath the fovea in 8 (15.7%) and 25 (29.4%) eyes, respectively, whereas 28 (54.9%) had no IS/OS line. Eyes with a continuous or discontinuous IS/OS line beneath the fovea had better final visual acuity (VA) than did eyes without an IS/OS line (P < .001, respectively). Of the 51 eyes, 36 showed polypoidal choroidal vasculopathy (PCV), whereas 15 were diagnosed as having typical AMD without PCV. Visual outcome was significantly better in eyes with PCV (P = .026). Most eyes (13/15; 86.7%) with typical AMD had no IS/OS line at the final visit, whereas only 13 (36.1%) of the 36 eyes with PCV had no IS/OS line beneath the fovea.

CONCLUSIONS:

Integrity of the photoreceptor layer beneath the fovea is associated with the final VA in neovascular AMD after successful PDT.

PMID:
19327745
DOI:
10.1016/j.ajo.2009.01.017
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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