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Am J Clin Nutr. 2009 May;89(5):1315-20. doi: 10.3945/ajcn.2008.26829. Epub 2009 Mar 25.

Association between n-3 fatty acid consumption and ventricular ectopy after myocardial infarction.

Author information

1
Departments of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences and Medicine, Duke University, Durham, NC, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

n-3 (omega-3) Fatty acids are associated with a reduced risk of cardiovascular disease; however, the relation between dietary intake of n-3 fatty acids and ventricular arrhythmias has not been investigated among acute post-myocardial infarction (AMI) patients-a group at elevated risk of malignant arrhythmias.

OBJECTIVE:

The objective was to examine the association between n-3 fatty acid consumption and ventricular ectopy among AMI patients.

DESIGN:

In 260 AMI patients, dietary intake of n-3 fatty acids was assessed by using the Harvard food-frequency questionnaire, and ventricular ectopy was estimated from 24-h electrocardiograph recordings.

RESULTS:

A greater intake of n-3 fatty acids (eicosapentaenoic acid + docosahexaenoic acid + docosapentaenoic acid + alpha-linolenic acid) was associated with lower ventricular ectopy (beta = -0.35, P = 0.011), and this effect remained after cardiovascular comorbidities were controlled for (beta = -0.47, P = 0.003). Higher concentrations of both marine-based (eicosapentaenoic acid + docosahexaenoic acid) (beta = -0.21, P = 0.060) and plant-based (alpha-linolenic acid) (beta = -0.33, P = 0.024) fatty acids remained associated with lower ventricular ectopy after cardiovascular comorbidities were controlled for.

CONCLUSION:

These findings extend existing evidence linking n-3 fatty acid consumption to a reduced risk of ventricular arrhythmias by showing that a greater intake of n-3 fatty acids may be associated with low ventricular ectopy among AMI patients.

PMID:
19321564
PMCID:
PMC2676996
DOI:
10.3945/ajcn.2008.26829
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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