Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Drug Alcohol Rev. 2009 Jan;28(1):60-5. doi: 10.1111/j.1465-3362.2008.00003.x.

Providing comprehensive smoking cessation care to surgical patients: the case for computers.

Author information

1
Hunter New England Population Health, Newcastle, Australia. luke.wolfenden@hnehealth.nsw.gov.au

Abstract

INTRODUCTION AND AIMS:

The provision of smoking cessation care to surgical patients before admission can reduce post-operative complications and encourage long-term smoking cessation. Our aim was to show how a comprehensive computer-based smoking cessation intervention, developed to enhance smoking cessation care to surgical patients, addresses barriers to care provision.

DESIGN AND METHODS:

Consultations with preoperative clinic staff and reviews of the scientific literature were conducted and identified the following barriers to the provision of effective smoking cessation care: a lack of organisational support, perceived patient objection, a lack of systems to identify smokers, a lack of staff time and skill, perceived inability to change care practices, a perceived lack of efficacy of cessation care and the cost of providing care. Based on positive findings of a pilot trial, a comprehensive computer-based smoking cessation intervention was implemented in a preoperative clinic. Data from previous evaluations of the intervention were used to assess the extent to which the intervention addressed clinician barriers to care.

RESULTS:

The computer-based intervention was found to provide a means to accurately and systematically identify smokers; it required little clinical staff time or skill; it was considered an acceptable form of care by staff and patients; it was effective in encouraging patient cessation and it was inexpensive to deliver relative to other surgical costs. Furthermore, the computer-based intervention continues to operate in the preoperative clinic in the absence of ongoing research support.

DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSIONS:

The implementation of such a model of care should be considered by clinical services interested in reducing the smoking related morbidity and mortality of patients.

[Indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Wiley
    Loading ...
    Support Center