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Curr Opin Urol. 2009 May;19(3):221-6. doi: 10.1097/MOU.0b013e32832a2d10.

Early prostate-specific antigen changes and the diagnosis and prognosis of prostate cancer.

Author information

1
Department of Clinical Laboratories, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York 10065, USA.

Abstract

PURPOSE OF REVIEW:

To delineate how recent findings on prostate-specific antigen (PSA) can improve prediction of risk, detection, and prediction of clinical endpoints of prostate cancer (PCa).

RECENT FINDINGS:

The widely used PSA cut-point of 4.0 ng/ml increasingly appears arbitrary, but no cut-point achieves both high sensitivity and high specificity. The accuracy of detecting PCa can be increased by additional predictive factors and a combinations of markers. Evidence implies that a panel of kallikrein markers improves the specificity and reduces costs by eliminating unnecessary biopsies. Large, population-based studies have provided evidence that PSA can be used to predict PCa risk many years in advance, improve treatment selection and patient care, and predict the risk of complications and disease recurrence. However, definitive evidence is currently lacking as to whether PSA screening lowers PCa -specific mortality.

SUMMARY:

PSA is still the main tool for early detection, risk stratification, and monitoring of PCa. However, PSA values are affected by many technical and biological factors. Instead of using a fixed PSA cut-point, using statistical prediction models and considering the integration additional markers may be able to improve and individualize PCa diagnostics. A single PSA measurement at early middle age can predict risk of advanced PCa decades in advance and stratify patients for intensity of subsequent screening.

PMID:
19318948
PMCID:
PMC2782618
DOI:
10.1097/MOU.0b013e32832a2d10
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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