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J Neurovirol. 2009 Apr;15(2):111-22. doi: 10.1080/13550280902769764.

Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome and the blood-brain barrier.

Author information

1
Tulane National Primate Research Center, Covington, LA 70433, USA.

Abstract

The blood-brain barrier (BBB) plays a critical role in normal physiology of the central nervous system by regulating what reaches the brain from the periphery. The BBB also plays a major role in neurologic disease including neuropathologic sequelae associated with infection by human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) in humans and the closely related simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) in macaques. In this review, we provide an overview of the function, structure, and components of the BBB, followed by a more detailed discussion of the subcellular structures and regulation of the tight junction. We then discuss the ways in which HIV/SIV affects the BBB, largely through infection of monocytes/macrophages, and how infected macrophages crossing the BBB ultimately results in breakdown of the barrier.

PMID:
19306229
PMCID:
PMC2744422
DOI:
10.1080/13550280902769764
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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