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Brain Inj. 2009 May;23(5):411-9. doi: 10.1080/02699050902788501.

Relationships among spiritual beliefs, religious practises, congregational support and health for individuals with traumatic brain injury.

Author information

1
Department of Health Psychology, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO 65212, USA. johnstoneg@health.missouri.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To determine relationships among spiritual beliefs, religious practises, congregational support and health for individuals with traumatic brain injury (TBI).

DESIGN:

A cross-sectional analysis of 61 individuals with TBI evaluated in an outpatient clinic using the Brief Multidimensional Measure of Religiousness/Spirituality (BMMRS) and the Medical Outcomes Scale-Short Form 36 (SF-36).

RESULTS:

For persons with TBI the BMMRS Meaning and Values/Beliefs sub-scales were significantly correlated with the SF-36 General Health Perception sub-scale and the BMMRS Religious Support sub-scale was significantly correlated with the SF-36 General Mental Health sub-scale. Hierarchical regressions indicated that the BMMRS Values/Beliefs and Forgiveness sub-scales accounted for 16% additional variance in SF-36 General Health Perception scores beyond that accounted for by demographic variables (i.e. age, income); no BMMRS sub-scales accounted for additional variance in predicting the SF-36 General Mental Health sub-scale beyond that accounted for by demographic variables (i.e. age, income).

CONCLUSIONS:

The physical health of individuals with TBI is associated with spiritual beliefs but not religious practises or congregational support. Better mental health is associated with increasing congregationally based social support for persons with TBI. Religious practises (i.e. praying, etc.) are not related to either physical or mental health, as some persons with TBI may increase prayer with declining health status.

PMID:
19306162
DOI:
10.1080/02699050902788501
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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