Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Acta Odontol Scand. 2009;67(4):193-9. doi: 10.1080/00016350902776716.

Association between periodontal disease and ischemic heart disease among Swedish women: a cross-sectional study.

Author information

1
Institute of Odontology, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden. Ulrika.Stenman@vgregion.se

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

The aim of this cross-sectional study was to analyze the relationship between chronic periodontitis and ischemic heart disease (IHD).

MATERIAL AND METHODS:

A cross-section of women aged 38 to 84 years were examined in 1992-93 (analysis based on n=1056). Medical and dental examinations were included in the analysis specifically with regard to IHD and periodontitis. Other well-known risk factors for IHD were used as covariates in multivariable statistical analysis.

RESULTS:

Among the dentate women in this study (n=847), 74 had IHD and 773 did not. There was no statistically significant difference between numbers of pathological gingival pockets between these groups (58.1% had one or more pathological pockets in the IHD group compared to 57.6% in the non-IHD group). Bivariate analysis of dentate individuals showed significant associations between IHD and number of missing teeth, age, body mass index, waist/hip ratio, life satisfaction, hypertension, and levels of cholesterol and triglycerides. However, in the final multivariable logistic regression model, with the exception of age, only number of teeth (<17 teeth) OR = 2.13 (CI 1.20; 3.77) was found to be significantly associated with IHD. Moreover, edentulous women had an OR of 1.94 (CI 1.05; 3.60) in relation to IHD (age-adjusted model).

CONCLUSIONS:

In the present study, periodontitis did not seem to have a statistically significant relationship with IHD. The number of missing teeth showed a strong association with IHD, and this may act as a proxy variable tapping an array of different risk factors and behaviors.

PMID:
19301159
DOI:
10.1080/00016350902776716
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Taylor & Francis
Loading ...
Support Center