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J Pharm Pharmacol. 2009 Apr;61(4):473-8. doi: 10.1211/jpp/61.04.0009.

Protective effects of coffee-derived compounds on lipopolysaccharide/D-galactosamine induced acute liver injury in rats.

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1
Department of Clinical Pharmacology, Tokyo University of Pharmacy and Life Sciences, Tokyo, Japan.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

The protective effects of coffee-derived compounds on lipopolysaccharide/D-galactosamine (LPS/D-GalN) induced acute liver injury in rats were investigated.

METHODS:

Wistar rats were orally administered saline (control) or one of the test compounds (caffeine, chlorogenic acid, trigonelline, nicotinic acid or eight pyrazinoic acids) at a dose of 100 mg/kg, respectively. This was followed by intraperitoneal injection with LPS (100 mug/kg)/D-GalN (250 mg/kg) 1 h after administration of the test compounds. Blood samples were collected up to 12 h after LPS/D-GalN injection, followed by determination of plasma aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase, tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) and interleukin 10 (IL-10) levels.

KEY FINDINGS:

Plasma aspartate aminotransferase and alanine aminotransferase levels were significantly increased after LPS/D-GalN-treatment, but were suppressed by pretreatment with caffeine (n = 5), nicotinic acid, non-substituted pyrazinoic acid or 5-methylpyrazinoic acid (n = 6, respectively) 12 h after LPS/D-GalN-treatment (P < 0.01, respectively). Moreover, the animals pretreated with these test compounds showed significantly higher survival rates (83-100%) compared with the control (23%). Only pretreatment with caffeine significantly suppressed the LPS/D-GalN induced elevation of plasma TNF-alpha levels 1 and 2 h after LPS/D-GalN-treatment (P < 0.01, respectively). Pretreatment with caffeine, nicotinic acid or non-substituted pyrazinoic acid activated the LPS/D-GalN induced elevation of plasma IL-10 levels at 1 and 2 h, although there were no statistically significant differences in IL-10 levels between control and nicotinic acid or non-substituted pyrazinoic acid treated rats.

CONCLUSIONS:

The results suggest that caffeine, nicotinic acid, non-substituted pyrazinoic acid and 5-methylpyrazinoic acid can protect against LPS/D-GalN induced acute liver injury, which may be mediated by the reduction of TNF-alpha production and/or increasing IL-10 production.

PMID:
19298694
DOI:
10.1211/jpp/61.04.0009
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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