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Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol. 2009 Dec;44(12):1013-21. doi: 10.1007/s00127-009-0023-7. Epub 2009 Mar 18.

Secondary prevention of hazardous alcohol consumption in psychiatric out-patients: a randomised controlled study.

Author information

1
Department of Clinical Science, Division Psychiatry, University Hospital Lund, 221 85 Lund, Sweden. sophia.eberhard@skane.se

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Hazardous alcohol use is associated with an increased risk for development of a substance use disorder, leading to negative outcomes in psychiatric patients.

AIMS:

In order to investigate whether psychiatric outpatients' hazardous alcohol consumption could be reduced by way of a brief intervention by telephone.

METHOD:

Non-psychotic psychiatric outpatients, n = 1,670, completed a self-rating form concerning alcohol habits (AUDIT). Participants with scores indicating risk consumption (n = 344) were randomised to intervention (immediate advice) or control (advice after 6 months).

RESULTS:

Hazardous alcohol habits occurred among 19% of the women and 24% of the men. In the intervention group, half of the patients reduced their alcohol consumption to non-hazardous levels at 6-month follow-up (ITT analysis). In women, 41.5% in the intervention group had no hazardous consumption at follow-up compared to 24.7% in the control group (P = 0.003), corresponding figure for men was 49.1 and 34.0%.

CONCLUSION:

Brief intervention seems to be effective to reduce hazardous alcohol consumption in psychiatric outpatients.

PMID:
19294323
DOI:
10.1007/s00127-009-0023-7
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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