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Cell Motil Cytoskeleton. 2009 Aug;66(8):500-8. doi: 10.1002/cm.20349.

Kinesin-5 in Drosophila embryo mitosis: sliding filament or spindle matrix mechanism?

Author information

1
Department of Molecular and Cell Biology, University of California at Davis, Davis, California, USA. jmscholey@ucdavis.edu

Abstract

The Drosophila syncytial embryo uses multiple astral mitotic spindles that are specialized for rapid mitosis. The homotetrameric kinesin-5, KLP61F contributes to various aspects of mitosis in this system, all of which are consistent with it exerting outward forces on spindle poles. In principle, kinesin-5 could accomplish this by (i) sliding microtubules (MTs), minus end leading, relative to a static spindle matrix or (ii) crosslinking and sliding apart adjacent pairs of antiparallel interpolar (ip) MTs. Here, I critically review data on the biochemistry of purified KLP61F, its localization and dynamic properties within spindles, and quantitative modeling of KLP61F function. While a matrix-based mechanism may operate in some systems, the work tends to support the latter "sliding filament" mechanism for KLP61F action in Drosophila embryo spindles. Cell Motil. Cytoskeleton 2009.

PMID:
19291760
PMCID:
PMC2778298
DOI:
10.1002/cm.20349
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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