Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Psychol Aging. 2009 Mar;24(1):217-23. doi: 10.1037/a0013807.

Effects of regulating emotions on cognitive performance: what is costly for young adults is not so costly for older adults.

Author information

1
Max Planck Institute for Human Development, Berlin, Germany. scheibe@stanford.edu

Abstract

The authors examined whether instructions to regulate emotions after a disgust-inducing film clip created an equally costly cognitive load across adulthood. Young and older adults across all instructional conditions initially demonstrated increased working memory performance after mood induction, typical of practice effects. Age-group differences emerged at the 2nd postinduction trial. When instructed to down-regulate disgust feelings, older adults' performance continually increased, whereas young adults' performance dropped. Instructions to maintain disgust did not affect working memory performance. Consistent with claims that older adults are more effective at regulating emotions, findings indicate that intentional down-regulation of negative emotions may be less costly in older age.

PMID:
19290754
PMCID:
PMC2658623
DOI:
10.1037/a0013807
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for American Psychological Association Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center