Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Health Psychol. 2009 Mar;28(2):226-37. doi: 10.1037/a0013169.

Symptom perception in children with asthma: cognitive and psychological factors.

Author information

1
Bradley/Hasbro Children's Research Center, Brown Medical School, Providence, RI 02903, USA. Daphne_Koinis-Mitchell@Brown.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

This study tested the differential effects of several cognitive and psychological variables on children's perception of asthma symptoms by use of an Asthma Risk Grid. Children's subjective and objective assessments of PEFR (peak expiratory flow rate) were characterized as representing perceptual accuracy, symptom magnification, and/or underestimation of asthma symptoms.

DESIGN:

The study included 270 children with asthma (ages 7-17) and their primary caregivers who completed measures assessing cognitive and psychological factors and a 5 to 6 week symptom perception assessment.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:

Children's symptom perception scores by use of the Asthma Risk Grid.

RESULTS:

Children's attentional abilities had more of a bearing on their symptom monitoring abilities than their IQ estimates and psychological symptoms. The more time children took on Trails and Cancellation Tasks and the fewer errors they made on these tasks, the more likely they were to perceive their asthma symptoms accurately. More time on these tasks was associated with more symptom magnification scores, and fewer errors were related to fewer symptom magnification scores. More errors and higher total scores on the Continuous Performance Task were associated with a greater proportion of scores in the danger zone.

CONCLUSION:

Statistical support was provided for the utility of attentional-based instruments for identifying children who may have problems with perceptual accuracy, and who are at risk for asthma morbidity.

PMID:
19290715
PMCID:
PMC2658619
DOI:
10.1037/a0013169
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for American Psychological Association Icon for PubMed Central
    Loading ...
    Support Center