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J Am Pharm Assoc (2003). 2009 Mar-Apr;49(2):192-9. doi: 10.1331/JAPhA.2009.09016.

A medication therapy management program's impact on low-density lipoprotein cholesterol goal attainment in Medicare Part D patients with diabetes.

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1
Florida Health Care Plans, Holly Hill, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

To determine a medication therapy management (MTM) service's impact on (1) Healthcare Effectiveness Data and Information Set (HEDIS) quality measures and (2) use and cost expenditures.

DESIGN:

Nonequivalent group, quasiexperimental study.

SETTING:

Florida, January 1, 2006, through September 30, 2007.

PARTICIPANTS:

2,114 Florida Health Care Plans Medicare Part D enrollees with diabetes.

INTERVENTION:

Intervention group participated in the MTM program during the HEDIS measurement year.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:

Presence of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) screening, LDL-C values, and LDL-C control (<100 mg/dL). The use measure was the total number of 30-day medication equivalents. Cost measures were (1) total Medicare Part D drug cost, (2) enrollees' out-of-pocket Part D medication costs, and (3) total medication copayments. Statistical analyses included chi-square, independent and paired t tests, and analysis of variance with post hoc comparisons.

RESULTS:

Of 2, 114 enrollees eligible for comprehensive diabetes care (CDC) according to HEDIS guidelines, 255 participated in the MTM intervention group and 56 patients were MTM eligible but opted out of the program or could not be reached for medication review during 2008 (MTM nonparticipants). A higher proportion of patients in the MTM participant group had LDL-C levels less than 100 mg/dL (69.0%) compared with those in the MTM nonparticipant (50.0%) and CDC only (54.1%) groups (chi2 = 20.9(3), P < 0.001). The two control groups' average LDL-C (90.8 and 93.6 mg/dL) was significantly higher than the intervention group (83.4 mg/dL, P < 0.001). Overall, per member per month use and drug costs differed from 2007 to 2008 and enrollees in the MTM participant group had greater percentage cost reductions.

CONCLUSION:

Enrollees who were eligible for MTM services but did not receive them had poorer clinical, use, and cost outcomes compared with the MTM intervention group. Pharmacists collaborating with physicians through a MTM program can improve quality of metrics for chronic diseases and reduce medication costs.

PMID:
19289345
DOI:
10.1331/JAPhA.2009.09016
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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