Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Neuroscience. 2009 Jun 16;161(1):269-92. doi: 10.1016/j.neuroscience.2009.02.075. Epub 2009 Mar 12.

Characterization and mapping of sleep-waking specific neurons in the basal forebrain and preoptic hypothalamus in mice.

Author information

1
INSERM U628, Lyon, F-69373, France and Claude Bernard University Lyon 1, 8 Avenue Rockefeller, Lyon Cedex 08, F-69373, France.

Abstract

We recorded 872 single units across the complete sleep-waking cycle in the mouse preoptic area (POA) and basal forebrain (BFB), which are deeply involved in the regulation of sleep and wakefulness (W). Of these, 552 were sleep-active, 96 were waking-active, 106 were active during both waking and paradoxical sleep (PS), and the remaining 118 were state-indifferent. Among the 872, we distinguished slow-wave sleep (SWS)-specific, SWS/PS-specific, PS-specific, W-specific, and W/PS-specific neurons, the last group being further divided into specific tonic type I slow (TI-Ss) and specific tonic type I rapid (TI-Rs) both discharging specifically in association with cortical activation during both W and PS. Both the SWS/PS-specific and PS-specific neurons were distributed throughout a wide region of the POA and BFB, whereas the SWS-specific neurons were mainly located in the middle and ventral half of the POA and adjacent BFB, as were the W-specific and W/PS-specific neurons. At the transition from waking to sleep, the majority of SWS-specific and all SWS/PS-specific neurons fired after the onset of cortical synchronization (deactivation), whereas all W-specific and W/PS-specific neurons showed a significant decrease in firing rate >0.5 s before the onset. At the transition from SWS to W, the sleep-specific neurons showed a significant decrease in firing rate 0.1 s before the onset of cortical activation, while the W-specific and W/PS-specific neurons fired >0.5 s before the onset. TI-Ss neurons were characterized by a triphasic broad action potential, slow single isolated firing, and an antidromic response to cortical stimulation, whereas TI-Rs neurons were characterized by a narrow action potential and high frequency burst discharge in association with theta waves in PS. These data suggest that the forebrain sleep/waking switch is regulated by opposing activities of sleep-promoting (SWS-specific and SWS/PS-specific) and waking-promoting (W-specific and W/PS-specific) neurons, that the initiation of sleep is caused by decreased activity of the waking-promoting neurons (disfacilitation), and that the W/PS-specific neurons are deeply involved in the processes of cortical activation/deactivation.

[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free full text
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Elsevier Science Icon for HAL archives ouvertes
    Loading ...
    Support Center