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Public Health Nutr. 2009 Dec;12(12):2279-84. doi: 10.1017/S1368980009005205. Epub 2009 Mar 12.

Maternal iodine status and neonatal thyroid-stimulating hormone concentration: a community survey in Songkhla, southern Thailand.

Author information

1
Department of Pediatrics, Faculty of Medicine, Prince of Songkla University, Hat-Yai, Songkhla 90110, Thailand. somchit.j@psu.ac.th

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To determine iodine intake and urinary iodine excretion (UIE) in a group of pregnant Thai women and the concentration of thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) in their neonates.

DESIGN:

A prospective cohort study.

SETTING:

Three districts of Songkhla, southern Thailand.

SUBJECTS:

Two hundred and thirty-six pregnant women.

RESULTS:

A quarter of the participants lacked knowledge of iodine and the prevention of iodine deficiency, although 70 % used iodized salt. Those who did not use iodized salt stated that they had no knowledge about iodine (57 %) and no iodized salt was sold in their village (36 %). The median iodine intake in the three districts was 205-240 microg/d, with 53-74 % of pregnant women having iodine intake <250 microg/d. The median UIE in the three districts was 51-106 microg/l, with 24-35 % having UIE < 50 microg/l. The mean neonatal TSH was 2.40 (sd 1.56) mU/l, with 8.9 % of neonates having TSH > 5 mU/l.

CONCLUSIONS:

The studied women and their fetuses were at risk of mild iodine deficiency. About a quarter of the participants lacked knowledge of the importance of iodine. Education regarding the importance of iodine supplements and the promotion of iodized salt should be added to national health-care policies in order to prevent iodine-deficiency disorders, diseases that are subclinical but have long-term sequelae.

PMID:
19278568
DOI:
10.1017/S1368980009005205
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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