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J Exp Bot. 2009;60(3):1047-62. doi: 10.1093/jxb/ern351.

Arabidopsis cold shock domain proteins: relationships to floral and silique development.

Author information

1
Division of Plant and Soil Sciences, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506-6108, USA.

Abstract

Cold shock domain proteins (CSPs) are highly conserved from bacteria to higher plants and animals. Bacterial cold shock proteins function as RNA chaperones by destabilizing RNA secondary structures and promoting translation as an adaptative mechanism to low temperature stress. In animals, cold shock domain proteins exhibit broad functions related to growth and development. In order to understand better the function of CSPs in planta, detailed analyses were performed for Arabidopsis thaliana CSPs (AtCSPs) on the transcript and protein levels using an extensive series of tissue harvested throughout developmental stages within the entire life cycle of Arabidopsis. On both the transcript and protein levels, AtCSPs were enriched in shoot apical meristems and siliques. Although all AtCSPs exhibited similar expression patterns, AtCSP2 was the most abundantly expressed gene. In situ hybridization analyses were also used to confirm that AtCSP2 and AtCSP4 transcripts accumulate in developing embryos and shoot apices. AtCSPs transcripts were also induced during a controlled floral induction study. In vivo ChIP analysis confirmed that an embryo expressed MADS box transcription factor, AGL15, interacts within two AtCSP promoter regions and alters the respective patterns of AtCSP transcription. Comparative analysis of AtCSP gene expression between Landsberg and Columbia ecotypes confirmed a 1000-fold reduction of AtCSP4 gene expression in the Landsberg background. Analysis of the AtCSP4 genomic locus identified multiple polymorphisms in putative regulatory cis-elements between the two ecotypes. Collectively, these data support the hypothesis that AtCSPs are involved in the transition to flowering and silique development in Arabidopsis.

PMID:
19269998
PMCID:
PMC2652047
DOI:
10.1093/jxb/ern351
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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