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J Immigr Minor Health. 2010 Apr;12(2):173-8. doi: 10.1007/s10903-009-9238-7. Epub 2009 Mar 6.

Problem gambling knowledge and perceived community impact among Asian-Pacific Islanders and non Asian-Pacific Islanders.

Author information

1
UCLA Gambling Studies Program, David Geffen School of Medicine, Semel Institute for Neuroscience and Human Behavior, Los Angeles, CA 90024, USA. tfong@mednet.ucla.edu

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Emerging data suggest that problem/pathological gambling may be highly prevalent among Asian-Pacific Islanders (APIs) and that can be a major concern to their communities.

METHODS:

This study surveyed problem/pathological gambling knowledge, attitudes, and perceived community impact of problem gambling among self-identified male and female APIs and non-APIs attending one of two API community events in Los Angeles County.

RESULTS:

Unexpectedly, our results indicated no effect for ethnicity with regards to ratings of problem/pathological gambling knowledge, community impact, or consequences. However, a gender effect with women reporting less problem/pathological-gambling-related knowledge than men, regardless of ethnicity was found. Over 40% of all respondents reported that problem/pathological gambling impacted their communities 'a lot', and the ratings for the impact of problem/pathological gambling was equal to ratings for other significant public health issues like diabetes, depression, drug abuse, and alcohol abuse.

DISCUSSION:

Based on these results, it is recommended that evidence-based legislation support the development of culturally-relevant prevention and intervention programs for problem/pathological gambling in Los Angeles County.

PMID:
19266282
PMCID:
PMC2839481
DOI:
10.1007/s10903-009-9238-7
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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