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Clin Pediatr (Phila). 2009 Jul;48(6):601-8. doi: 10.1177/0009922809332680. Epub 2009 Mar 4.

Late effects in long-term survivors after treatment for childhood acute leukemia.

Author information

1
Department of Pediatric Hematology-Oncology, Children's National Medical Center, Washington, DC,USA. tbhaddy@aol.com

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

This is a report of late effects in childhood cancer survivors seen in the follow-up clinic of a single institution.

MATERIALS AND METHODS:

There were 324 acute leukemia survivors in the database of the Long Term Follow Up Clinic of Children's National Medical Center from January 1, 1997, through June 30, 2005.

RESULTS:

Of the 324 acute leukemia survivors, 228 were white, 48 black, 20 Hispanic, and 12 other. Their follow-up time was 0 to 25 years (mean 5.3 years). One or more adverse events occurred in 74.1% of the 324 survivors. Defective physical growth was most commonly reported, followed by disturbed neurocognitive function, emotional difficulties, cardiac abnormalities, hypertension, osteoporosis/osteopenia, fractures, and second neoplasms. More black and Hispanic children had acute myeloid leukemia, relapses, cardiac problems, and hypertension than white and other subjects.

CONCLUSION:

Childhood cancer survivors require lifelong monitoring, with prompt identification and treatment of adverse late effects.

PMID:
19264722
DOI:
10.1177/0009922809332680
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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